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Title

Paleogenomics in a Temperate Environment: Shotgun Sequencing from an Extinct Mediterranean Caprine

AuthorsRamírez, Óscar ; Gigli, Elena ; Bover, Pere ; Alcover, Josep Antoni ; Bertranpetit, Jaume ; Castresana, José ; Lalueza-Fox, Carles
KeywordsPaleogenomics
Extinct Mediterranean Caprine
Sequencing
Balearic Islands
DNA
Temperate Environment
Issue Date22-May-2009
PublisherPublic Library of Science
CitationPLoS ONE 4(5): e5670 (2009)
Abstract[Background] Numerous endemic mammals, including dwarf elephants, goats, hippos and deers, evolved in isolation in the Mediterranean islands during the Pliocene and Pleistocene. Most of them subsequently became extinct during the Holocene. Recently developed high-throughput sequencing technologies could provide a unique tool for retrieving genomic data from these extinct species, making it possible to study their evolutionary history and the genetic bases underlying their particular, sometimes unique, adaptations.
[Methodology/Principals Findings] A DNA extraction of a ~6,000 year-old bone sample from an extinct caprine (Myotragus balearicus) from the Balearic Islands in the Western Mediterranean, has been subjected to shotgun sequencing with the GS FLX 454 platform. Only 0.27% of the resulting sequences, identified from alignments with the cow genome and comprising 15,832 nucleotides, with an average length of 60 nucleotides, proved to be endogenous.
[Conclusions] A phylogenetic tree generated with Myotragus sequences and those from other artiodactyls displays an identical topology to that generated from mitochondrial DNA data. Despite being in an unfavourable thermal environment, which explains the low yield of endogenous sequences, our study demonstrates that it is possible to obtain genomic data from extinct species from temperate regions.
Description6 pages and 4 figures
Publisher version (URL)http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0005670.g004
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/14178
DOI10.1371/journal.pone.0005670.g004
ISSN1932-6203
Appears in Collections:(IMEDEA) Artículos
(IBE) Artículos
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