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Title

Using perls staining to trace the iron uptake pathway in leaves of a Prunus rootstock treated with iron foliar fertilizers

AuthorsRíos Ruiz, Juan José ; Carrasco-Gil, Sandra ; Abadía Bayona, Anunciación ; Abadía Bayona, Javier
Issue DateJun-2016
PublisherFrontiers Media
CitationRíos JJ, Carrasco-Gil S, Abadía A, Abadía J. Using perls staining to trace the iron uptake pathway in leaves of a Prunus rootstock treated with iron foliar fertilizers. Frontiers in Plant Science 7: art. 893 (2016)
AbstractThe aim of this study was to trace the Fe uptake pathway in leaves of Prunus rootstock (GF 677; Prunus dulcis × Prunus persica) plants treated with foliar Fe compounds using the Perls blue method, which detects labile Fe pools. Young expanded leaves of Fe-deficient plants grown in nutrient solution were treated with Fe-compounds using a brush. Iron compounds used were the ferrous salt FeSO4, the ferric salts Fe2(SO4)3 and FeCl3, and the chelate Fe(III)-EDTA, all of them at concentrations of 9 mM Fe. Leaf Fe concentration increases were measured at 30, 60, 90 min, and 24 h, and 70 μm-thick leaf transversal sections were obtained with a vibrating microtome and stained with Perls blue. In vitro results show that the Perls blue method is a good tool to trace the Fe uptake pathway in leaves when using Fe salts, but is not sensitive enough when using synthetic Fe(III)-chelates such as Fe(III)-EDTA and Fe(III)-IDHA. Foliar Fe fertilization increased leaf Fe concentrations with all Fe compounds used, with inorganic Fe salts causing larger leaf Fe concentration increases than Fe(III)-EDTA. Results show that Perls blue stain appeared within 30 min in the stomatal areas, indicating that Fe applied as inorganic salts was taken up rapidly via stomata. In the case of using FeSO4 a progression of the stain was seen with time toward vascular areas in the leaf blade and the central vein, whereas in the case of Fe(III) salts the stain mainly remained in the stomatal areas. Perls stain was never observed in the mesophyll areas, possibly due to the low concentration of labile Fe pools.
Description13 Pags.- 1 Tabl.- 7 Figs.
Publisher version (URL)http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2016.00893
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/134640
DOI10.3389/fpls.2016.00893
E-ISSN1664-462X
Appears in Collections:(EEAD) Artículos
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