English   español  
Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/111263
Share/Impact:
Statistics
logo share SHARE logo core CORE   Add this article to your Mendeley library MendeleyBASE

Visualizar otros formatos: MARC | Dublin Core | RDF | ORE | MODS | METS | DIDL
Exportar a otros formatos:

Title

A comparison of multiple methods for estimating parasitemia of hemogregarine hemoparasites (apicomplexa: Adeleorina) and its application for studying infection in natural populations

AuthorsMaia, Joao P. M. C.; Harris, David James; Carranza, Salvador ; Gómez-Díaz, Elena
Issue Date17-Apr-2014
PublisherPublic Library of Science
CitationPLoS ONE 9(4): e95010 (2014)
AbstractIdentifying factors influencing infection patterns among hosts is critical for our understanding of the evolution and impact of parasitism in natural populations. However, the correct estimation of infection parameters depends on the performance of detection and quantification methods. In this study, we designed a quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay targeting the 18 S rRNA gene to estimate prevalence and intensity of Hepatozoon infection and compared its performance with microscopy and PCR. Using qPCR, we also compared various protocols that differ in the biological source and the extraction methods. Our results show that the qPCR approach on DNA extracted from blood samples, regardless of the extraction protocol, provided the most sensitive estimates of Hepatozoon infection parameters; while allowed us to differentiate between mixed infections of Adeleorinid (Hepatozoon) and Eimeriorinid (Schellackia and Lankesterella), based on the analysis of melting curves. We also show that tissue and saline methods can be used as low-cost alternatives in parasitological studies. The next step was to test our qPCR assay in a biological context, and for this purpose we investigated infection patterns between two sympatric lacertid species, which are naturally infected with apicomplexan hemoparasites, such as the genera Schellackia (Eimeriorina) and Hepatozoon (Adeleorina). From a biological standpoint, we found a positive correlation between Hepatozoon intensity of infection and host body size within each host species, being significantly higher in males, and higher in the smaller sized host species. These variations can be associated with a number of host intrinsic factors, like hormonal and immunological traits, that require further investigation. Our findings are relevant as they pinpoint the importance of accounting for methodological issues to better estimate infection in parasitological studies, and illustrate how between-host factors can influence parasite distributions in sympatric natural populations. © 2014 Maia et al.
DescriptionThis is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Publisher version (URL)http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0095010
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/111263
DOI10.1371/journal.pone.0095010
Identifiersdoi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0095010
issn: 1932-6203
Appears in Collections:(IBE) Artículos
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
parasitemia_Maia.pdf1,29 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail
View/Open
Show full item record
Review this work
 

Related articles:


WARNING: Items in Digital.CSIC are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.